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Author Topic: Modern History of Fashion: Week 1 Resources  (Read 5075 times)

Debbie Baskerville

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Modern History of Fashion: Week 1 Resources
« on: January 29, 2013, 05:00:34 pm »
This week you are studying the Baroque (17th Century) and Rococo Eras (18th Century).  Use your textbook first, but here are some additional resources.  Just click on the links below, or you can also download the attachment.

17TH CENTURY/BAROQUE (1600s):


About Indian printed cottons and how they made their way to Europe:
http://www.musee-impression.com/gb/collection/indiennes.html
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/intx/hd_intx.htm
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/empire_seapower/east_india_01.shtml
http://www.threadsmagazine.com/item/4987/bold-bright-chintz



The Victoria and Albert Museum has a wealth of information about both fashion and DECORATIVE ARTS:
http://www.vam.ac.uk/page/b/baroque/



About the Cavaliers and Puritans:
http://www.djmcadam.com/puritan-age.html
http://www.cwu.edu/~robinsos/ppages/resources/Costume_History/cavalier.htm
http://www.cfa.ilstu.edu/lmlowel/THE331/Baroque/review.htm



Pinterest can be a wonderful source for images.  Just be sure to use a critical eye, looking at dates and determining if the images are showing actual historical clothing or modern costume reproductions- for this class you want the real thing!  Here's a great one:
http://pinterest.com/angelammmm/17th-century-jacobean-louis-xiii-xiv-commonwealth-/



Large collection of Baroque era paintings: http://www.kipar.org/period-galleries/index.html



Art from Flemish Baroque Painter Anthony Van Dyke: http://www.abcgallery.com/V/vandyck/vandyck.html



18TH CENTURY/ROCOCO (1700s):


The Kyoto Costume Institute has a nice interface where you can see all the silhouettes through time and click to explore the styles: http://www.kci.or.jp/archives/digital_archives/index_e.html 



From the Victoria & Albert Museum: http://www.vam.ac.uk/page/0-9/18th-century-fashion/


Article from the Met Museum: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/eudr/hd_eudr.htm



A blog post about the "Chemise a la Reine", originated by Marie Antoinette: http://www.thefashionhistorian.com/2012/03/chemise-la-reine.html



Paintings by Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun (female!) artist and official court painter for Marie Antoinette: www.batguano.com/vigeegallery.html
Paintings by Antoine Watteau (click on "works"): http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/bio/w/watteau/antoine/biograph.html



About 18th century hairstyles: http://www.dirjournal.com/info/the-history-of-coiffure-in-the-xviii-century/



The official website of Versailles:
http://www.chateauversailles.fr/chateau
"Court Pomp" Exhibition: http://fastesdecour.chateauversailles.fr/index_en.html



More from Pinterest:
http://pinterest.com/chrissii/1700-s-fashion/


About the industrial revolution: http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1981/2/81.02.06.x.html



About the invention of the jacquard loom: http://www.wired.com/thisdayintech/2009/07/dayintech_0707


BOTH ERAS:


The Met Museum can be a little complicated to search, but it has a lot to see.  I recommend the thematic essays in the "Timeline of Art History".  For example, these are from the 17th Century in Europe: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hi/te_index.asp?i=17
Or, you can do a collections search and narrow it down by "who, what, where, when"...for example: http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections?&where=Europe&what=Costume|Dresses&ft=*&when=A.D. 1600-1800&pg=1



This blog has images of clothing and illustrations from many of the time periods you will be studying this session.  However, it's not very clearly organized, so you may have to dig around a little.  This article shows some satirical illustrations that make fun of the more extreme fashions from the 1600's and 1700's (and other periods), as well as discussing some interesting historical figures. https://thepragmaticcostumer.wordpress.com/?s=satire
I do want to warn you that not all blogs are historically accurate, and they should be approached with caution, but this one is very credible, and one of the best things about it is that all the images are linked back to where they were found, which will show you some other great places to look for historical fashion. 
« Last Edit: January 31, 2016, 09:39:42 am by Debbie Baskerville »