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Author Topic: EFFECTIVE RESUMES  (Read 1355 times)

Dawn Hawkins

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EFFECTIVE RESUMES
« on: December 02, 2011, 06:54:24 pm »
Writing a résumé is not an automatic process, and will require a lot of thought and frequent revision. Your résumé should be neat, legible and reflect your abilities as a designer in content, composition and layout. It should highlight your creativity and work visually with other elements of your portfolio. How the document will be delivered is also an important consideration. Ensure the design and layout is consistent with your other marketing materials and portfolio.

When creating your first résumé, it should be no more than one page but still include some very necessary information, such as:

    Contact Information
    Career Statement
    Professional Experience/Employment Record
    Computer and Software Skills
    Education
    Awards and Accomplishments
    Design Clubs and Organizations
    References

Contact Information

Always include necessary contact information for yourself. The majority of résumés will include a telephone number, address, e-mail address and the URL of the Website hosting a digital portfolio. Always include a means of contact. Other more personal data may include hobbies, interests, and membership in clubs or organizations. Avoid anything that may be even slightly misconstrued, such as religion, race, age, gender, and politics.

Career Statement

This short statement will express your goal as a designer as it relates to the position you are applying for. This will change according to the job description, but should remain basically the same in regards to your long-term goals.

Professional Experience/Employment Record

The businesses you worked for, the positions held, and any experience in the workplace should be made available in this section. Internships, freelance or any activity relevant to the graphic design field should most definitely be included. Be creative! It's important to realize that skills required in most jobs also are required in graphic design. So if you have worked as a clerk at a local pet shop and think that has nothing to do with graphic design, think again! Explain how that experience has helped you develop customer service and organizational skills. It may work to list the details of each position as bullet points beginning with action verbs. Just remember to use the same tense throughout your résumé.

Computer and Software Skills

Itís a good idea to include a list of computer systems and the pertinent software at which you are proficient. Many prospective employers will skip other information provided to see if you have the right computer skills for a particular job before looking at the rest of your résumé. Be sure you are experienced in the current industry standards. Use the full name of the software and spell it correctly.

Education

Employers are interested in knowing the specific career educational experiences that have been gained since high school or pre-secondary education. The date of graduation and degree/certificate from a college or post-secondary educational program should always be included. It would be to your advantage to indicate any grade point averages of 3.5 or higher that you have achieved.

Awards and Accomplishments

Awards and accomplishments can be as varied as winning a local design competition to completing a marathon. It is a misconception that non-career centered accomplishments should remain off the résumé. Although it is most informative to the potential employee to list as many career related accomplishments as possible, do not avoid the others. Your non-career accomplishments can be points of interest in what may otherwise be a dry interview. They can be used to set you apart from other candidates and show signs of your self-development.

Design Clubs and Organizations

If you are a member of local or national graphic design clubs or organizations, AIGA for example, list them.

References

You will also want to provide contact information for references (if specifically requested) or list that they are available upon request. Be sure to notify your references and ask their permission, prior to adding their names to your résumé.

Types of Résumés

We've talked about content and design for your résumé. Now let's look at three different types of résumés:

   Chronological
   Functional
   Combination
   Chronological

This type of résumé is built upon experience in the field. The chronological résumé dates content from most recent to the earliest. Usually, no more than the last four jobs or educational activities are listed. Some of these items may be summarized depending upon relevance to the position desired.

Functional

The functional résumé lists only the jobs, or activities, which are relevant to the desired position. This kind of résumé focuses solely on the skill, competence and experience an individual has, geared towards a specific position. The functional résumé does not include a chronology.

Combination

The combination résumé lists items in a chronological order, but emphasis is on relevant information pertaining to the desired position. In this sort of résumé, specific activities or skills are often emphasized.

The type of résumé you choose to build should be based on your experience and goals. Remember to keep it brief, easy to read, consistent in layout, relevant and cohesive.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2016, 02:46:06 pm by Margaret Helthaler »